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FOR PARENTS

These articles and resources form a contemporary evidence base for the teaching and learning of reading and viewing; writing and representing; speaking and listening. 

Books offer a healing retreat for youngsters caught up in the pandemic

 Margaret Kristin Merga in The Conversation August 9 2021

This Conversation article by Margaret Kristen Merga from Edith Cowan University outlines the findings from a research project on school libraries and well-being provide insight into how books and reading can help young people deal with the well-being challenges of the pandemic. The findings suggest books can not only be a great escape during this challenging time, but also offer further well-being benefits. Parents, teachers, school librarians and school leaders will appreciate this article.
 
Key words: Reading research School libraries  Reading for pleasure Fostering empathy Well-being Pandemic,
 
Link to Touchstones
1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11

A Brief History of 'The Reading Wars'

 Brian Cambourne, University of Wollongong Foundation for Learning and Literacy, April 2021
 
Brian Cambourne provides a summary of the history of the debates about reading instruction dating from as far back as 1779 and outlines the debates that have occurred, and reoccurred through the 1950’s, 1960’s, 1970’s and continue to resurface every decade since. Cambourne’s history begs the following question: 'Why is reading education so pedagogically confused? The answer to this question lies in history as well as in different understandings about what reading is.’ This short paper published by the Foundation for Learning and Literacy provides a very useful perspective with Cambourne concluding that ‘Such theoretical arguments are not helpful for the teaching profession or the teaching of reading. To date, not enough attention has been paid to educators’ experiences and their evidence in helping children learn to read in classroom contexts.’
 
Key words: Reading  Reading wars  Reading research  Reading pedagogies
 

Children's audiobooks are growing in popularity. How useful are they for kids learning to read?

ABC News online 4 July 2021 by Sarah Scopelianos
 
This short online article provides insights for parents and educators into the benefits of using audible books with children alongside reading aloud to them. The article cites research undertaken by the UK National Literacy Trust that found “benefits to listening to audio that mirror those of reading, and [these] really helped legitimise their place as part of a child's reading journey”.
Advice from Australian literacy expert Misty Adoniou was sought. She advises parents to read to their children, not only to build their relationships but also for greater learning outcomes. Dr Adoniou, an adjunct associate professor in literacy and language at the University of Canberra and a principal fellow at the University of Melbourne, says reading isn’t just about sounding out words. She describes it as “gaining meaning”. Misty Adoniou acknowledges that some of the benefits of reading aloud carry over into audiobooks, like exposing young readers to harder books they can’t read yet. “If we leave it, we’ll just have kids reading what they’re able to read by themselves [and] then they’re stuck on low-level, low-interest books in the beginning,” Dr Adoniou says. More complex stories increase a child’s vocabulary, which is a huge benefit."We know that the size of your vocabulary is the best indicator of success at school; not just in reading, in every curriculum area," Dr Adoniou says.
Key words: Reading  Vocabulary  Audible books,
 

Tips for Parents and Carers to Support the Development of Their Child's Reading

Jo Padgham (Principal, Turner School 2016)

This article provides ideas for parents on how to support early reading development. The article gives suggestions that can be easily incorporated into family routines.

Key words: Reading  Early childhood

The Benefits of Reading for Pleasure

Wilhelm, Jeffrey D. Edutopia; October 30, 2017

This article summarises a study by Jeffrey Wilhelm and Michael Smith that finds reading for pleasure has many forms, and each form provides distinct benefits that are outlined in the article. It concludes; “Make no mistake, the next generation standards worldwide require profound cognitive achievements. Meeting such standards and the demands of navigating modern life will require student effort and the honing of strategies over time. Promoting the power of reading for pleasure is a proven path there.”

Key words: Reading Pleasure  Choice Research Lifelong reading

Reading for Pleasure

Rosen, Michael blogspot Friday 26 February 2021

In this blog, well-known author Michael Rosen unpacks the question How does Reading for Pleasure produce this seemingly magic effect without direct instruction? To answer that question, Rosen looks at the process of reading and how children and young people respond. Rosen has a check list for teachers to discuss, adapt, argue with in whatever ways they choose.The checklist includes reading for pleasure creates a space for readers to interpret; to experience empathy;to leap from the oral code of English to the written code; to learn knowledge and wisdom; to learn about stylistic devices and to learn about possibility and change.

Rosen concludes this blogpost with “There is a lot of talk in the air about how to help children 'catch up' because of the pandemic. Helping children to read widely and often for pleasure will help them ... This is a kind of education in a holistic way.

Key words: Reading  Pleasure  Choice  Research  Lifelong reading

Tips for Parents and Carers to Support the Development of Their Child’s Writing Through the Primary Years

Jo Padgham (Principal, Turner School 2017)

This article makes suggestions for parents to support their child’s writing development. It is divided into sections making it easily accessible for parents to identify an area they can try at home. 

Key words: Writing  Early childhood  Primary

Meeting the Needs of Struggling Readers and Writers

This Foundation for Learning and Literacy published article is one of two partner articles on supporting struggling readers and writers and expands on Touchstone 6. The partner article is Principles for working with struggling readers and writers- advice for teachers across primary and secondary schools.

This article draws on research and practice in order to provide teachers and school leaders with research evidence and informed instructional and organisational practices to meet the needs of those students who are struggling as readers and writers.

Key words: Reading  Writing  Intervention  Engagement  Support  Strategies  Expectations

Principles for Working with Struggling Readers and Writers - Advice for teachers across primary and secondary schools

This Foundation for Learning and Literacy published article is one of two partner articles on supporting struggling readers and writers and expands on Touchstone 6. The partner article is Meeting the needs of struggling readers and writers, particularly in the later primary years and secondary years.

This article outlines principles aimed to assist teachers in adjusting their literacy teaching for individual students who are experiencing some difficulty with reading and writing. They are based on what research tells us about struggling readers and writers.

Key words: Reading  Writing  Difficulties  Engagement  Support

Children's Rights to Read

International Reading Association (2020)

The International Reading Association has published this useful and important list for teachers and parents to keep in mind.

Key words: Reading 

Helping Your Child to Read

In March 2020, Noella Mackenzie, Associate Professor at Charles Sturt University wrote 3 short posts for parents and carers on her blog. Each of the posts provides useful support for parents and carers who have children who are learning to read.Helping your child with reading:

1 Reading Aloud

2. Reading WITH your child

3. Children reading BY themselves

Key words: Reading  Parent support  Motivation

The Rights of A Writer Poster for Classrooms

Jo Padgham (Principal, Turner School 2017)

This poster provides suggestions for parents to support their child’s writing development. It is divided into sections making it easily accessible for parents to identify an area they can try at home.

Key words: Writing  Early childhood  Primary

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